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The Danger of Getting Even


Robby

We all know what it’s like when we are the victim of injustice at the office. Maybe your boss takes credit for a project where you did most of the work. Perhaps a coworker gets special treatment that you find unfair. Or maybe it just seems like you’re always getting the worst assignments. There’s a huge temptation to exact revenge, but listen to your parents: just don’t do it.

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There’s an old expression about this situation, Don’t get mad, get even What’s appealing about this notion is that you are redirecting your energy into something which feels like it’s going to set the balance right. But “getting even” usually means making someone else feel the pain that you’ve already experienced. Or, to use another common expression, An eye for an eye leaves the whole world blind.

There is an answer for workplace behavior that just doesn’t seem fair. To continue the theme of memorable sayings: Don’t get even, get productive.. If someone knocks you down, makes you look bad or receives something you think you deserve, try focusing on getting your work done. That’s the reason you are at work, after all: to be productive.

If your productivity goes unrecognized, or if you’re the victim of real harassment, it’s time to speak to someone about your options. That might be an HR representative, an employee assistance program (EAP) counselor or a private therapist. It may also be time to call the most productive contact of all: a recruiter to talk about your next job.

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About the Blogger: Robby Slaughter is a productivity speaker and expert. He is a principal with a AccelaWork, an Indianapolis consulting firm.

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