peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet hogan outlet scarpe hogan outlet hogan outlet online moncler outlet moncler sito ufficiale piumini moncler outlet woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet hogan outlet scarpe hogan outlet hogan outlet online woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet

Supporting the workers of Indianapolis: Employed—Unemployed; Happy—Frustrated; Executive—Employee. All are welcome!

Home » The Indy At Work Blog

Are You the Victim of a Micromanager?


Robby

If your manager is a micromanager, it can be just awful. They are looking at every piece of work you do, stopping you, making adjustments, moving things around, and controlling your time. It’s enough to drive someone crazy. What should do if you’re being micromanaged?

Here’s how to escape: make sure they understand the cost of micromanagment.

That sounds like a cop-out. What does a micromanager care about cost? The truth is, the reason that a micromanager micromanages is BECAUSE of cost. They are afraid that you won’t do things right, and that your errors will cost the company more in the long run.

Of course, there’s a trade off between the amount of management you give someone and the cost of correcting mistakes. On the extreme end, you could give people zero direction and wait weeks or months to find out what they are doing wrong. This would clearly be a big problem.

But on the other hand, if you stop to check in on someone every ten minutes they aren’t going to have the chance to concentrate to get things done.

If you’re being micromanaged, you need to figure out how to communicate the cost of the micromanagement. You might start recording the amount of time spent by your manager in meetings with you. Or you might reverse the trend and try to beat them to the punch, dropping in on their office to ask questions before they can trouble you.

Another option is to ask for concentration time. Explain that you think you can do a task more efficiently if you can go to a conference room and focus. Ask for your micromanager to predict how long it will take for you to complete a task, and then schedule their return visit to your desk. That can space things out, and prove that their interruptions are an unnecessary cost.

Finally, the best part about proving cost to a micromanager is that your supervisor doesn’t get it, you have good evidence that it may be time to move on. There’s nothing quite like the freedom of knowing you don’t fit.

Like this post? Share it through your social networks:

About the Blogger: Robby Slaughter is a productivity speaker and expert. He is a principal with a AccelaWork, an Indianapolis consulting firm.

Read more by

Wed, November 2 2011 » Corporate Culture, Stress and Mindfullness

Leave a Reply