peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet hogan outlet scarpe hogan outlet hogan outlet online moncler outlet moncler sito ufficiale piumini moncler outlet woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet hogan outlet scarpe hogan outlet hogan outlet online woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet

Supporting the workers of Indianapolis: Employed—Unemployed; Happy—Frustrated; Executive—Employee. All are welcome!

Home » The Indy At Work Blog

Should You Talk Politics at Work?


Robby

If you’re an American, there’s a good chance you enjoy a sharp political discussion. And considering that it’s just about always election season, it’s easy to get into these discussions at the office.

So, should you talk about politics at work?

Here’s my opinion: Only if you work for a think tank, a political campaign or a media source. Otherwise, no good can come of it.

There’s actually a scientific phenomenon at work here called confirmation bias. In simple terms, we have a tendency to overvalue people and resources that support our view, and undervalue the opposite.

unnamed
For example, if people disagree with your political opinions at work, it’s likely that this will color their judgement. They may not consciously decide you are an unreliable or unprofessional person, but they may be less likely to want to interact with you or see the best in you in the future.

So what if you agree with other people? Being agreeable seems like a good strategy at work, since it makes people like you.

The problem with this is that individuals will form alliances and expect you to see other things their way. So while you may agree on a popular issue in the country, you might disagree about a business decision at work. The political alliance makes it harder to have candid, balanced discussions about workplace issues.

So don’t do it!

 

Like this post? Share it through your social networks:

About the Blogger: Robby Slaughter is a productivity speaker and expert. He is a principal with a AccelaWork, an Indianapolis consulting firm.

Read more by

Wed, February 22 2012 » Corporate Culture, Stress and Mindfullness, Success Consciousness

Leave a Reply