peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet hogan outlet scarpe hogan outlet hogan outlet online moncler outlet moncler sito ufficiale piumini moncler outlet woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet hogan outlet scarpe hogan outlet hogan outlet online woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet

Supporting the workers of Indianapolis: Employed—Unemployed; Happy—Frustrated; Executive—Employee. All are welcome!

Home » The Indy At Work Blog

The Other Side of Changing Your Career


Robby

Ever since I moved to Indianapolis, job seekers have been reaching out to me to ask for advice. That’s not because I’m an expert at finding people jobs in Indianapolis. I think it’s because I like to network and like to be helpful. And I’m always happy to review a resume and offer any suggestions.

But lately, more and more people have been telling me they want to change their career. They are tired of what they have been doing for years and are ready to try something new. Maybe they used to work in non-profit marketing and now want to go into pharmaceutical sales. Or perhaps they were trained as an accountant, but are looking to work in healthcare. Or maybe they have tons of retail experience but want to switch to an office job.

I feel for people who want to change their jobs. It’s a big decision to walk away from what you used to do and go after something new. But it seems like most of these people seeking new Indianapolis jobs aren’t thinking about one crucially important element.

They aren’t considering the point of view of a company that would be hiring them.

Consider one young woman I met who went to school to become an environmental engineer. She ended up taking a field job that involved working outdoors to take samples and going back to the lab to run tests. But after a few years, she decided that she wanted to do something entirely different. She wanted to get into the veterinary world and work with animals.

vet\'s office
© Flickr User ccox888

If you apply to work in a vet clinic with years of experience as an engineer, you’re probably going to get turned down. That’s because there are other candidates who have years of experience in vet clinics. So you are, by nature, less attractive to that employer.

That doesn’t mean you can’t change your career. But rather, it means that changing your career is about telling the right story.

For example, if you were an environmental engineer who worked in the field, you might explain how you are self-motivated and can work for long periods of time with no supervision. You might also explain how you love nature and have a scientific mind. You might also show how you have volunteered with pet shelters and rescue organizations. And you might try to network your way into a vet clinic by making friends with a current employee.

It’s difficult to change your career. But if you want to make it easier on yourself, think of the career change from the perspective of the employer. Ask the question: why should they consider someone who hasn’t been doing this for years?

Answer that, and your new career is sure to blossom.

Like this post? Share it through your social networks:

About the Blogger: Robby Slaughter is a productivity speaker and expert. He is a principal with a AccelaWork, an Indianapolis consulting firm.

Read more by

Fri, March 22 2013 » Career Planning and Goal Setting, Change Managment and Learning Organization

Leave a Reply