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Don’t be a Jobseeker Spammer


Robby

About once a month, I get a certain type of email from a jobseeker. It’s usually sent to the generic contact@companyname.com account, but not always. Often, the email has a résumé attached, but not always. But all of these emails having something in common: they come from a jobseeker who has unwittingly become a spammer.

Here’s what these emails look like:

Dear Sir or Madam:

I am a graduate of ABC University and have 10 years of experience in business management. I came across your company when searching the web, and found what you do very interesting. I was wondering if you have any open positions at this time.

Best,
John Doe

Can you see it? Do you spot what makes this Indianapolis jobseeker look like a spammer?

Spam
© Flickr User epSos.de

The reason this is a bad move is because to the recipient, this email looks completely generic. It could have been sent to thousands of companies.

Of course, this might not be the case. Maybe this jobseeker really is based in Indianapolis, and really did find our company, and really did see it as “very interesting.” But nothing about the message showed that off.

This advice about being specific and unique applies not only to random emails that a jobseeker might send to a company, but also that jobseekers should use for any kind of interaction. Write a cover letter that’s tailored to the company where you are applying. Write a thank you note that references what happened in the interview. Figure out the name of the person you are contacting so you don’t have to write “Dear Sir or Madam.”

Anything you can do to not look like a jobseeker spammer will help you get a job!

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About the Blogger: Robby Slaughter is a productivity speaker and expert. He is a principal with a AccelaWork, an Indianapolis consulting firm.

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Wed, October 30 2013 » Career Planning and Goal Setting, Personal Organization, Self Development, Success Consciousness

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