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Protect Your Office From Burglary


Guest Blogger

Indianapolis businesses are growing, which unfortunately mean crime is growing too. Today’s guest post asks the question: How can you protect your office from burglars?

FBI statistics are staggering. Burglaries cost Americans $4.6 billion in losses each year. More than 26 percent of those burglaries take place in businesses, and 60.5 percent of those crimes involved forcible entry. If, like most businesses, you can’t afford to allow someone to walk away with your valuable assets, it is time to come up with a comprehensive plan for protecting yourself.

Alarm Systems: Are they Overrated?

Arming your business with an all-in-one fire and burglary alarm system covers you in two ways, according to Business Know How. As long as your system is connected to a service that responds to alarms, you know that you have someone “watching” your business around the clock. These monitoring services will call within 60 seconds of your alarm system being activated. If you don’t answer your phone the service will contact the police. That means that within minutes of someone breaking into your building, the police will be on their way. If the crooks are brazen enough to hang around, there’s a good chance they will be caught. If they run, you’ve protected your property.

If the bad guys do get away, there is a simple tip for helping make sure that they are nabbed sometime during the investigation process. Most crooks “fence” the property they steal, selling it to a third party for cash. Look around your business and identify anything that a robber may be able to make away with: computers, cash registers, and office equipment are all easy to grab and go. Make sure that your business’s identifying information is on every piece of equipment. The name and address of your company, and even a contact number, can be etched onto an inconspicuous spot. The real likelihood is that your property will wind up in a pawn shop somewhere. Your identifying information can make all the difference as your case is investigated.

Office Safety - Burglar Alarm
© Flickr User ell brown

Lights: A Deterrent or a Waste of Energy?

According to the Mesa, Arizona Police Department, lighting and good visibility are the best protection against becoming a victim of burglary. Leaving your lights on and making sure that hedges and other obstacles are removed automatically makes your business less attractive to would-be crooks. The idea is to make sure that the bad guys have nowhere to hide as they attempt to break into your building and that they realize that they will be spotted by anyone who passes by. Softly lighting your business makes it easier for police officers driving by to check for any unwanted guests.

The Mesa Police Department also suggests that if you have any cash registers visible from the outside, leave the drawers open and empty so that crooks know there is no money to be found there. Make sure to strategically hide away any valuable items, like laptops and cell phones.

Mail: Is it Worth Protecting?

Protecting your business from mail theft is as important as locking your doors at night, according to LifeLock. By accessing your mail, a criminal is able to obtain important identifying information about your business; information they can use to acquire credit under your business name. If your business collects personally identifying information about your clients — such as social security numbers, birth dates, and account numbers — you are responsible if it falls into the hands of criminals. There are laws in place that put the responsibility of protecting your client’s private information squarely on your shoulders.

Make sure that all mail is collected and put in a breach-proof place each day. Revisit how well your business is protected in order to help ensure that no one can get in without someone being alerted.

Justin Rogers has a master’s degree in journalism and writes about the entertainment industry.

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Tue, November 12 2013 » Ethics and Fraud

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