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Reconstructing Boring Job Posts


Sean

You have read them. You have applied to them. The “them” I am taking about are boring job posts. As for someone applying, did you feel inspired to work for the company after reading the job post? As the company, are you not attracting the “great” talent out there?

Reconstructing Boring Job Posts
© Flickr User Mike Vasilev (Flickr, Creative Commons)

Many companies today are facing problems with their job posts. They are relying on company reputation and not expanding their company culture and creativity into their hiring. For example, do college athletic scouts use the same hiring tactics 5 years ago? The answer is NO. So why have company job posts remain “boring”? Is it easier to be generic with having many job posts? Are their government regulations preventing companies to only post certain criteria? There is no right answer until the company figures out how to fulfill their needs. Right now, the commonality is prospects are sending “boring” resumes and cover letters because the job posts are “boring” and do not show any humanization or company life. So what is a company to do?

If a company is able to make changes, then STOP auto generating job posts with the same spiel. The job post should be an advertisement. You want to attract people to work for your company. Here are a few ways to do this.

Be Descriptive yet Concise
A good approach is finding a middle ground between overly descriptive and short yet sweet job description. A job post should not overwhelm and should entice applicants to apply.

Stick to the Company Needs
Company job posts have the laundry lists and the overwhelming detail. Putting every detail in the job post is only adding filler and not explaining what the company needs. For this, think like the applicants. Would the company rather have an applicant willing to do the day-to-day tasks and build the company? Or would the company like to have an applicant who may be more entitled and not fill the necessary goals to add value to the company?

Be Creative
The job post needs to have “flair”. This could range on how reaching out to talent, writing creative job posts, or even incorporating a personalized yet professional company career page. Creative job descriptions are clever yet practical. If the job post is for a coder, some possibilities are to describe finding rabbit holes and diving deeper, making calculated decisions between spending time wisely and wasting time, or making sure the company becomes fast and reliable as possible.

The Applicant’s Responsibility
Now, I am giving a challenge to the applicants. Be creative and stick to your strengths on how to demonstrate your fit for the position and for the company. Applying for job is a two way street. The responsibility is not solely on the company. No matter your profession is; your cover letter has to be so amazing the hiring manger shouts, “I’ve found them!” You have no excuse writing a boring cover letter. If you are a good communicator, use it. If you are not, have a good writer help you. Do not waste your talents and your resources.

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About the Blogger: Sean Sullivan (@seansullivan110) is host at Converge Coffee. When he is not podcasting, you can find Sean at networking events, cultural events, and coffee shops quoting too many movies.

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Mon, December 30 2013 » Corporate Culture

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