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Working from Home Actually Declining


Kathy

Awhile back I came across an interesting chart. It illustrates changes in how we commute to work over our lifetimes. While the graph aims to show the increase in how many of us drive our own cars, what I noticed was the change in the number of people working from home.

In everyday conversation people often talk about working from home and how technology has made that so much easier. Yet I wonder if that is the whole story. Based on this chart, 7% of the population worked from home, as opposed to 4.2% today. If technology is making it easier to work from home, then why is the number of people lower?

Commuting to Work
© Flickr User jczart

I would argue this difference comes from the change in how we work. Over the 20th century, our lives became more centralized. In the 19th century, everything happened at home: work, school, medical needs, etc. That started to change after the industrial revolution. Now we have whole buildings dedicated to specific purposes, like offices, schools and hospitals.

Looking at how the percentage has increased from 1980 though, I wonder if we are starting to head in the opposite direction? Home-schooling children continues to be popular. Holistic, home-based healing is increasing in popularity. Will technology actually return us all to working at home? Or has the push toward centralization permanently changed what we expect?

Read more in the original
story on NPR.

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About the Blogger: Hi, I'm Kathy G. Slaughter. Based on my personal experience and professional expertise, I believe "the un-examined life is not worth living." Un-examined patterns and beliefs hinder our ability to live rewarding and authentic lives. Our behavior, whether in or outside the workforce, consists of knee-jerk psychological reflexes. This reality limits our ability to be happy and productive in all areas of life. My passion lies in helping individuals and organizations identify patterns and beliefs that are limiting their ability to fulfill their role in an authentic and satisfying ways. My greatest goal is to connect with you and through our connection, transform how you perceive your life and your choices. Life is too short to live it un-examined.

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Mon, December 2 2013 » Corporate Culture, Work/Life Balance

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