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Should Hiring Managers Give Feedback After an Interview?


Robby

If you’re on the market for a new job, one of the more frustrating aspects is going to interview, getting rejected, having no idea why.

This raises a fundamental question about the job search process: should interviewers give feedback to candidates?

Interview Feedback
© Flickr User bpsusf

I think there are two problems with giving feedback to a candidate after interview.

First of all, we live in a litigious society. Many hiring managers are scared to death of their actions being viewed as unlawful discrimination. Therefore, they don’t want to give feedback.

But the second problem is that “what you did wrong in the interview” is not something that can often be easily explained. It’s not as if interviews are like practical tests where we are looking for right and wrong answers. What probably went wrong in the interview was that you didn’t happen to develop a rapport with this particular interviewer.

In a larger sense the issue is that interviews are an asinine way to select among candidates for permanent position. Interviewing is nothing like doing the job. We should review portfolios, give people the chance to do some short-term paid work, and hire based on their results.

So if you’re looking for a job in Indianapolis, what should you do? Ensure that the interview doesn’t matter. Network your way into the company so that they already know who you are and are already impressed by your work. Show off your stuff weeks before you actually apply by submitting a portfolio or by seeking a recommendation from a current employee.

The interview is a terrible way to determine if you’re good for a job, so do your best to make it as cursory as possible. Sell yourself before you arrive. Then, you won’t need any feedback.

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About the Blogger: Robby Slaughter is a productivity speaker and expert. He is a principal with a AccelaWork, an Indianapolis consulting firm.

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Thu, January 2 2014 » Career Planning and Goal Setting, Corporate Culture, Ethics and Fraud

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