peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet hogan outlet scarpe hogan outlet hogan outlet online moncler outlet moncler sito ufficiale piumini moncler outlet woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet hogan outlet scarpe hogan outlet hogan outlet online woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet

Supporting the workers of Indianapolis: Employed—Unemployed; Happy—Frustrated; Executive—Employee. All are welcome!

Home » The Indy At Work Blog

Face to Face Communication is Making us Lazy


Robby

In this time of virtual connections, social media, multi-party telephone calls, and web conferences, it’s easy for people to communicate in ways besides doing so face-to-face. Even here in Indiana, we have the world headquarters of a successful national telework company. But it’s the face-to-face communication that is always best. Right?

In some respects, face-to-face communication can actually make us lazy. Since we don’t have to be clear because we can always draw a picture, re-explain, or rely on body language—we tend to be less clear in person. We fire off opinions without thinking about what we are going to say. We shoot from the hip, rather than consider our position carefully. We tend to get emotional when we should be rational.

Having an Argument
© Flickr User Aislinn Ritchie

It’s can be good for your communication skills to work remotely because it helps you become more precise and more efficient! If you practice writing good emails, being clear on the phone, or expressing yourself when you don’t have the advantages of being face-to-face, you’ll become a better communicator.

Here are some tips for improved interaction with others:

  • Take your time: Do it right, rather than right now. This one is easy to say but hard to do. If you can pause a few seconds, you’ll probably give a better response than if you respond immediately–whether in person or via technology at a distance. And most people will give you a moments if you ask for it, especially if you give them a deadline. “Can I think it over and give you an answer tomorrow?” will almost always yield a positive result.
  • Stick to words and terms you know, and especially words and terms you’re confident they know. It can be all too easy to drop something into a conversation or an email that sounds right but isn’t actually right. It’s okay to use jargon and company-specific language, but be sure that the other person knows what those terms mean.
  • Use analogies. The difference between talking with someone in person versus communicating at a distance via technology is kind of like eating out versus cooking at home. Sure, there’s less effort involved in going to a restaurant, but if you cook your own meals once in a while you gain a greater appreciation for the process of preparing food—and you might even become a better restaurant patron. Use your own analogies to make points.

Is face to face communication making us lazy? Maybe. But certainly, it’s easy to fall into traps that don’t apply when you’re sending a text message or jumping on to Skype. Pay attention to how you communication, and you’ll get better at doing it.

Like this post? Share it through your social networks:

About the Blogger: Robby Slaughter is a productivity speaker and expert. He is a principal with a AccelaWork, an Indianapolis consulting firm.

Read more by

Tue, June 10 2014 » Self Development, Success Consciousness, Technology Tips

Leave a Reply