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3 Ways Hourly Work Hurts Productivity


Sean

Having a business idea doesn’t take much effort. Acting on the idea takes up many resources. The daily grind can hurt peoples’ chances to get pass that “glass ceiling”. Constantly pushing on unbudging glass won’t make it move. If you do decide to start your own business, please weigh the alternatives. Feel confident in your decision. Giving up stability is difficult. Passion doesn’t pay the bills. And creating a business takes much discipline. You are sacrificing your time. But taking time doesn’t scale. I can give testament to this. To grow a business, I had to figure out a way to scale.

Clock© Flickr User Becky Lai

How Do You Scale?

Growing can be difficult—especially if you don’t know what you are doing. I charged by the hour. And I ran into a conundrum with a client. I blocked off a certain amount of hours each day. I took on all work for that time frame. And I ran face first into a wall. I couldn’t grow. Here are a few roadblocks to avoid:

  • Unbalanced Work Schedule. Sometimes the client preyed on my time by shoveling massive amounts of work. Or I did not receive much work during the time frame, and I wasted time waiting. The unbalanced workload hurt my productivity. I scheduled my whole day around “that” time.
  • Concrete Deliverables. Since I did not charge by the project, I did not have the mindset to track deliverables. My days were disrupted. I didn’t have a structured routine. I felt like I was playing catch up.
  • Communication Suffered. Being brief would have saved the relationship. Too much communication through many channels created chaos. And both sides forgot how to communicate best: being clear, open, and honest.

As I look back, the wise decision was project based work. I would have delegated my time better. And I could have scaled. For the same amount of time, I could help one or two more clients. I wouldn’t have to wait for project coming in. I would work based on the projects given. Making the correct time usage helps build more trust. The company grows. And financial freedom seems attainable. Know your limits. Know how long projects take you. If a new project takes longer, develop skills to shorten. Your time is valuable. People never ask for less time.

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About the Blogger: Sean Sullivan (@seansullivan110) is host at Converge Coffee. When he is not podcasting, you can find Sean at networking events, cultural events, and coffee shops quoting too many movies.

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Tue, April 7 2015 » Self Development, Success Consciousness, Time Management, Work/Life Balance

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