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Do You Have To Pay Your Dues?


Robby

Indiana, deep in the heartland of the Midwest, is a place where people often assume there are conservative values about business. One of those assumptions is that you have to “pay your dues” before setting out on your own.

But a post called 6 Lies They Teach in Business School claims the opposite:

Despite what business professors may say, you don’t have to work in a corporate environment before starting a company. “There’s pressure to talk to corporate recruiters,” says Long, whose instructors and advisors placed a strong emphasis on landing a job with a high-profile employer.

Unlike many of her peers, Long skipped diving headfirst into the traditional Wall Street gig after graduation. Rather than a sexy pedigree, she believes, “persistence and grit” are what it takes to succeed as a founder—and she should know. Bethesda, Md.-based Illustria Designs, which has 20 employees, has raked in more than $1 million in revenue.

Abby Falik, a Harvard Business School grad, also chose to forgo a corporate job and go it alone. “I’ve been struck by how many of my classmates, now five-plus years into corporate jobs, are seriously questioning the paths they were encouraged to take coming out of business school,” says Falik, who is still running the company she started after earning her MBA.

Making Copies
© Flickr User Alan Cleaver

It’s easy to find examples of companies—even in Indianapolis—that are finding success despite the relative lack of “real-world” experience of their leaders. Like DoubleMap, which made the Inc. 30 Under 30 List. Or there’s Verge, who has been featured in The Washington Post. Or Lesson.ly’s youthful founder Max Yoder.

But it’s not just technology companies that can be started by people with virtually no experience. Consider Hoosier Momma, which offers a line of specialty food products that is now distributed nationally. They were opened in 2010 by a pair of friends who had no experience in manufacturing and distribution, and not much knowledge of food industry in general.

Or what about the company that makes a $450 bicycle pump here in Indianapolis? They are selling their wares all over the world, even though that’s an invention which is more than a century old.

You don’t need to pay your dues. You need customers. Make it happen!

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About the Blogger: Robby Slaughter is a productivity speaker and expert. He is a principal with a AccelaWork, an Indianapolis consulting firm.

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Tue, June 16 2015 » Corporate Culture, Indianapolis News

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