peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet peuterey outlet peuterey sito ufficiale giubbotti peuterey outlet hogan outlet scarpe hogan outlet hogan outlet online moncler outlet moncler sito ufficiale piumini moncler outlet woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet hogan outlet scarpe hogan outlet hogan outlet online woolrich outlet piumini woolrich outlet giubbotti woolrich outlet

Supporting the workers of Indianapolis: Employed—Unemployed; Happy—Frustrated; Executive—Employee. All are welcome!

Home » The Indy At Work Blog

Bring a Portfolio, Not Promises, To Your Interviews


Robby

Lots of jobseekers prepare for the on-site conversation with the hiring manager by figuring out ways to answer the common questions. “Where do you see yourself in five years?” “What is your greatest weakness?” “Why should I hire you?”

But getting ready to promise what a great employee you are going to be is not very helpful. Anyone can make a promise. What you need is a portfolio.

Portfolio
© Flickr User intenteffect

I’ve talked about this before. One key reason you want to bring work samples to an interview is because by itself, the interview is a dumb an ineffective method for matching candidates to job. And in a broader sense, you shouldn’t say what you can do but prove what you have done.

What To Include

A an article on the website job-hunt.org has a great list:

  1. Resume
  2. Cover Letter
  3. Reference Page
  4. Copies of Letters of Recommendation
  5. Copies of Educational Certificates, Certifications, Licenses and Degrees
  6. Copies of Transcripts
  7. Copies of Awards, Honors, or other Recognition Items
  8. Samples of Work or Summaries of Projects. This could include a report you wrote, a print out of a spreadsheet you designed, a flow chart, a test you took, a project summary, a flowchart, etc.
  9. Positive employment evaluations.

A lot of this stuff you would say you have: a degree, references, or positive reviews from past bosses. But putting them in front of a potential employer makes them real. Most of us have some of this stuff, if not all of it. So, bring it!

What to Remember

A piece from the site jobmob.co.il makes several comments about the topic in general. Two stand out:

1) Never assume you don’t have enough to fill a portfolio

Even college students can include transcripts, letters of recommendation from professors, and even college papers on work-related topics.

This is correct. You can also do sample work. Make something for fun and put it in, as long as it’s work related and on-brand.

3) Formatting counts

Put a table of contents at the beginning of your portfolio, and number the pages so that you and potential employers can navigate it easily.

Absolutely. Bad formatting is a reason reject just about everything.

Go work on your portfolio. Keep working on it. And bring it to every interview!

Like this post? Share it through your social networks:

About the Blogger: Robby Slaughter is a productivity speaker and expert. He is a principal with a AccelaWork, an Indianapolis consulting firm.

Read more by

Wed, October 4 2017 » Career Planning and Goal Setting

Leave a Reply