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When to Quit Your Job


Robby

There are four times that you should quit your job. The issue is recognizing if you’re really in one of these situations, and taking action.

Here they are.

Man in Suit
© Flickr User Patricia dos Santos Paton

When You’re Unexpectedly Offered a New Job That You Want

Imagine this scenario: things are going just fine at your current position, and a recruiter calls you and tells you about a new position at another firm. You interview, and get an offer, and it seems like a great career move. You discuss with your close family and friends and decide to say yes.

This is rare, but a great reason to leave your current job. (And whatever you do, don’t use this as a chance to try and negotiate a counteroffer and stay where you are.)

You Dislike Your New Job, Find a New Job, and Switch

Consider a different situation: you have a job that has problems. You’ve tried to address them but things just aren’t changing. So you go out, find a new job, take the offer, and quit your current job. Simple and straightforward.

You Dislike Your New Job, And Decide to Quit Rather Than Become Unprofessional

Being human means not being a robot. If your workplace is toxic you may not be able to remain professional. You may be at risk of lashing out or causing problems that would impact your reputation.

In that situation, quitting your job might be the best course of action—even if you don’t have a new job.

It may be painful but a great weight will be lifted.

You Can’t or Shouldn’t Work for Personal Reasons

Injured? Suffering from a debilitating physical or mental health condition? Taking care of a loved one? These are all good reasons not to work. If you try and go to a job while managing an extreme personal situation, you won’t be a good employee and you won’t do what needs to be done in your personal life.

Your health and your personal commitments come first. Take care of then, and then get a job.


Those are the only four reasons to quit your job. But the hard part is realizing you’re in one of them, and making the decision. It’s easy to stay in a job because you’re getting paid. But if you need to move on, do it.

In the end, you’ll have made the right choice.

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About the Blogger:

Robby Slaughter is a productivity speaker and expert. He is a principal with a AccelaWork, an Indianapolis consulting firm.

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Wed, November 22 2017 » Career Planning and Goal Setting, Corporate Culture

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