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Don’t Be Late. But If You Will Be, Here’s What to Do


Robby

I think people in the Midwest are pretty good about being on time. Indianapolis seems to be a city where appointments matter and the time is important, but we’re not so serious that being a few minutes late makes everyone angry.

Still, it’s important to be on time. A meeting with a time is a promise, and if you’re late you’re breaking your word. What should you do if that’s going to happen?

Running Late
© Flickr User Alan Levine

Step 1: Communicate When You’re Going to Arrive

It’s almost always the case that you know you’re going to be late well in advance of it happening. You can call or text to indicate that you won’t be there on time.

But what’s even more important is to give an updated estimate. Will it be 10 minutes? Twenty? Or an hour? With the new timeframe, the person you’re meeting with can make plans.

Step 2: Acknowledge Your Error

“I’m sorry I’m late” should be met with “Thank you, I understand” or “That’s okay” or some other kind response. But even though you know the person is going to accept it, you still should apologize. Because again, being late means you broke a promise. None of us are perfect, but admitting when we are wrong helps us to feel more connected and comfortable with another.

Step 3: State Your Plan to Prevent Tardiness in the Future

If you’re late to an event that you go to with some frequency (such as work) you should and explain what you will do next time—instead of giving an excuse! That way you help people to see that not only do you know you shouldn’t have been late, but that you are making an effort to change.

Being Late Isn’t The End of the World

We all make mistakes. Sometimes it’s because we are careless. Other times it’s because we’re overly optimistic. But being late is something we know we shouldn’t do. Be the person you want others to be for you, and do your best to be on time!

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About the Blogger: Robby Slaughter is a productivity speaker and expert. He is a principal with a AccelaWork, an Indianapolis consulting firm.

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Wed, February 14 2018 » Self Development

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