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Of Course You Need a Job. But Don’t Act Like You Do.


Robby

If there’s a good way to summarize the economy in Indiana (and in America at large), it’s this: most people need jobs, but most organizations only offer jobs because they can’t think of any other way to run their business.

Let’s say that again: any job you’ve ever had would go away if someone figured out how to do it without a person.

This is an old story, told in countless different ways. There used to be elevator operators who got you to the right floor. Now you push your own buttons. There used to be people selling snacks; now many have been replaced by vending machines. We dial ourselves to reach people instead of being connected by an operator. We’ve had self-driving trains for years and we’ll have self-driving cars soon, according to most experts. Whatever your job is, there’s a risk of it disappearing due to automation.

Telephone Operators
© Flickr User reynermedia

But more importantly is the attitude you bring to your job. If you think the company needs you, then you’re wrong. The company needs the work done. Right now, you’re the one doing it. But they could replace you with someone else, or perhaps, no one.

What does this mean for you, besides being conscious of automation? First, don’t act like you need a job. Act like you have something to offer, and constantly be working to offer something more specialized and more human.

Second, look for ways to innovate. If there is work you do that you can stop doing because there are ways to make software or systems or services do it for you, bring that up.

Finally, try not to think about income as supporting your lifestyle, but rather representing your value. If you’re worried about paying the bills and feeding the kids, it will come through in your work. If you’re focused on being valuable to your employer, that value can increase and be respected.

We all need money. But strangely, we can’t act like we need it. We have to act like we’re worth it.

That’s what makes the difference.

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About the Blogger: Robby Slaughter is a productivity speaker and expert. He is a principal with a AccelaWork, an Indianapolis consulting firm.

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Wed, May 16 2018 » Uncategorized

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